News Flash

A letter in the Daily Telegraph is reproduced here, written by a group of organisations in the private sector who are dedicated to reducing the Brtain's drug culture.

SIR – We represent leading voluntary and private sector abstinence-based rehabilitation centres in England. We were concerned by the revelations in Kathy Gyngell’s report, published by the Centre for Policy Studies, Breaking the Habit: why the state should stop dealing drugs and start doing rehab (“Benefits and treatment for drug addicts cost £3.6 billion a year”,, June 19).

We call on the Government to make abstinence-based rehabilitation central to the implementation of its drugs policy. Fewer than 2 per cent of addicts seeking help to quit drugs are currently referred to rehab. An immediate goal of 25 per cent is feasible. Such a commitment is necessary to turn around the tanker of dependency.

In the two years before the general election, an average of one rehab unit closed each month. A progressive decline in statutory referrals, with the loss of about 1,000 beds, continues. Yet taxpayers are funding the continued dependency of the 98 per cent of addicts in so-called treatment, to the tune of billions of pounds. This process will continue if the Coalition leaves current commissioning arrangements for drugs and alcohol services in place under the direction of the National Treatment Agency, soon to be transferred to Public Health England.

Unless the Coalition takes action quickly, the Prime Minister’s call to help addicts to become clean, free of drugs and build new lives, will be thwarted.

Deirdre Boyd
CEO, Addiction Recovery Foundation 
Ed Smith
Director, Acorn Treatment and Housing 
Peter Walker
CEO, Addiction Recovery Agency 
Richard Johnson
Director, ANA Treatment Centres 
Ges Schofield
Manager, Ark House 
Derek Mace
CEO, Bosence and Boswyns 
Gina Dormer
CEO, Broadreach Group 
Brian Dudley
CEO, Broadway Lodge 
Clive Wolfendale
CAIS Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation 
Simon Stephens
Director of case work, Addictions UK 
Barnaby Guthrie
CEO, Clinical Partners 
Chip Somers
CEO, Focus12 
Wendy Dawson
CEO, Ley Community 
Anthony Massouras
Chairman, Mimosa Healthcare Group 
Ruth Allonby
CEO, Mount Carmel 
Jan and Carl de Vera Davey
CEOs, Open Minds 
Carl Edwards
Director, Park View Project 
James Peacock
Senior statutory coordinator, Perry Clayman Project 
John Grady
Director, Pierpoint Addiction Treatment 
Steve Spiegel
Director, Providence Projects 
Arlene Rodgers
Director, Quinton House 
Jon Harman
Director, Ravenscourt Trust 
Gavin Cooper
Managing director, Trust the Process 
Tom Kirkwood
CEO, TTP Recovery Communities 
Amanda Thomas
CEO, Western Counselling 
Ken Wiltshire
Director, Yeldall Manor 
Matthew Franzidis
Chief operating officer, Priory Healthcare

Further, it seems an important signatory to the concordat; The Salvation Army, was omitted from the letter it is added here for clarity,

The Salvation Army – Gloucester House Addictions Rehabilitation Centre (via Major Dean Logan).

The link to the letter can be found in the opening parag raph, and again here: Daily Telegraph

Drink Poll
Drink Poll

Drinking too much - safer drinking tips for party goers.

As Don Shenker, the chief executive of Alcohol Concern was recently quoted in the national media*: "We'll all enjoy a festive drink over the coming weeks, but there is no longer any doubt that far too many people are drinking at dangerous levels."  Although the festive season is meant to be about celebration and enjoying time together, there are many that are drinking too much over the holiday period.  In fact the Department of Health is so concerned about this trend, that they have announced a mobile phone application that can be downloaded that acts as an alcohol tracker.  (see iTunes or visit NHS for more information).

Although this innovative new tool allows drinkers to input how much they are consuming and view graphs of whether they are sticking to recommended units, there is still an element of discipline and pre-planning required to do this.  So, how can you enjoy the festive season, but not put yourself at risk?  A spokesperson from  Linwood Park gives you some hints:

Know your limit - First of all, it is important to know ‘how much is too much'.  Government guidelines for safe drinking suggest that 21 units for a man and 14 units per week for a woman are safe.  This works out at 2-3 units of alcohol per day for a woman and 3-4 units for a man.

Size matters! - Remember that the measurement of a unit of drink is suggested as being half a pint of beer, a glass of wine or a pub measure of spirits.  If you are celebrating at home it is worth keeping in mind that measures will be vastly different to those in a pub and watch out for those specialty beers and spirits that will be more units per glass.

Advanced planning - Before you go out for a celebration, think how much you plan to drink and stick to it.  Also, if you think that no food is going to be served there, eat first.  Drinking on an empty stomach is a recipe for disaster.  Finally, think about how you will be getting home and don't leave it to chance, have taxi numbers in your phone or pocket to ensure the night doesn't end badly.

Social drinking - Round-buying is the ticket to disaster.  Either choose to skip rounds or buy your own, so you don't ‘drink to keep-up'.  Also keep an eye on the number of times a drink is topped-up.  Just because you haven't had to go to the bar for a refill, doesn't mean you aren't consuming way over the legal limit.

Pace yourself - Pace is key to a night you will want to remember, not forget!  Alternate alcohol and soft drinks, or dilute alcoholic drinks to ensure you don't overdo it.  Remember the darker the drink the worse the hangover, so go for spritzers or shandy rather than red wine or whisky.

Dance the night away - Rather than placing all of the focus on drinking, why not make sure that there is something else planned for the evening of festivities, such as dancing, bowling, a pub quiz/games Etc.  This will help take the focus off of the alcohol and ensure that the night's fun revolves around more than just getting drunk.

Whether you are planning to party out and about, or at home this festive season, remember that you can be in control of your drinking.  By thinking ahead and planning your evening you can ensure that not only will you have a night that you remember, but one that your body doesn't regret for days afterwards.

If the thought of regulating your drinking seems unthinkable, or you are finding that the need to celebrate the festive season doesn't end on January 1st and you think that you are drinking too much, why not check out Linwood Park's Traffic Light Drinking system to see if you need to get some professional advice on taking control of the drink, before it takes control of you?

If you would like to find out more about drinking too much or need help with yours or a loved one's drinking, then why not call Linwood Park's confidential helpline on: Freephone 0800 066 4173 (or if you are calling from a mobile phone or from overseas, call +44 1226 698 054) to find out how to get help sooner rather than later? Alternatively you can complete the form here on the web site, to be found at the foot of each page.

*The Guardian, Saturday 12 Dec 2009 ‘MP's back alcohol price control to curb drinking'.

Last Updated (Tuesday, 19 April 2011 09:13)


Get in Touch with The Linwood Group

Confidential Contact Form

Looking for Help with Alcohol or Drug Problems? We can help, either call us now by landline on FREEPHONE 0800 915 1560 or use this form to receive for FREE, expert advice in complete confidentiality.

Required *

Sorry bu you appear to have omitted you name!

Sorry but you have not provided a telephone number